AESOP Congress, 10-14.07.2018, Gothenburg, Sweden

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H. Chang: Stakeholder workshops as a pedagogy for experiential learning in collaborative planning education: An action research at the Department of Urban Planning, NCKU, Taiwan (photo credits: me)

This was perhaps one of the most interesting conferences I have ever attended. I followed the track of education since day 01 and I was amazed by the high levels of participation and engagement until the end. I met a lot of interesting people and I am very pleased to have worked with them, shared my thoughts with them and discussed with them on the future of urban planning education.

I was very excited to have been able to gain some relevance compared to what we have been doing, especially on transdisciplinary learning. The Round table on Friday was a great experience for me. I think that all of us present agreed on being advocates of collaborative practices, social inclusion and cultural empathy as basic prerequisites for co-creation in urban planning and planning education.

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Round table brainstorming on the competencies of the future urban planners (photo credits: R. Rocco)

 

 

Making Space for Hope, AESOP 2018 Conference

AESOP 2018

See you next in AESOP 2018 Conference, Gothenburg, 10-14 July 2018!

TRACK 10 – EDUCATION_SESSION 8
Planning Education, Pedagogy and Didactics III

Creative Networked urban Design Studio: Transforming Elaionas through collaborative, reseacrh-based pedagogical approaches

Marda, N., Ioannou, O.

The paper describes a research and practice teaching methodology developed for an urban design studio at undergraduate and postgraduate level and how it transformed the teaching and learning experience. The area considered in both cases was Elaionas; a degraded, chaotic, post-industrial landscape near the Athens centre. The aim was to engage students in city planning creatively through the use of innovative tools of academic research and collaborative field work in order to interpret and manage urban complexity. A series of transdisciplinary analytic tools were employed for mapping such as tracking technologies and spatial analysis, design software and programming, while at the same time artists engaged students in the lived experience of the place. Live encounters were also realized with public sector representatives and other stakeholders.

Course content was set up as a network of researchers and resources where learning is rhizomatic and therefore collaborative and contextual. In this framework, students were required to choose the resources they were interested in pursuing further and to form their own strategies; they were asked to establish connections with the local community; they were also encouraged to share and compare their findings and their respective representations via blogging and social networks thus creating their own creative networked research community. Enhancing communication between students, experts and stakeholders raised student awareness and created an environment of possibilities. As a result, their plans for the regeneration of Elaionas demonstrated a positive attitude by involving local communities and other institutional agents toward the creation of sustainable urban environments.

 

Image available here

A10 cooperative’s meeting in Amsterdam

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Last week many of the A10 new European architecture correspondents met in Amsterdam. It was our first meeting since the cooperative’s official establishment and naturally there was a lot to talk about. Interestingly enough, despite our diverse backgrounds we’ve discovered that we have a lot in common and that we share a common perspective on where we want to go with this publication in the near future. It was a real pleasure for me to be part of this process and I look forward to materializing our intentions.

In the meantime, we’ve already completed the first phase of the EU Survey on the culture of architectural competitions in collaboration with Architectuur Lokaal and a first volume of the work in progress is now available. The conference held on the 28th and the 29th of September for the EU Survey was a great opportunity for us to discuss our findings and elaborate on many concepts related to the architectural competitions’ tradition and practices. Many thanks to Walter Menteth and Cillie Jansen for showing us fulkrum.eu. Special mention to Antigone Katsakou and her book entitled ‘The Competition Grid: Experimenting With and Within Architecture Competitions,’ (soon to be published by RIBA) as well as to Jonas Andersson and Magnus Ronn for their book ‘Architectural Competitions-Histories and Practice,’ available here. Special mention also goes to Angel Borrego Cubero and his film “The Competition” which was screened during day II.

Other new undertakings will soon be announced as well. I’ll keep you posted.

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Second Image belongs to Tarja Nurmi 

 

The culture of architectural competitions in Europe


Architectuur Lokaal along with A10 new european architecture cooperative have published their latest results of an EU Survey regarding architectural competitions in Europe. This issue constitutes their primary contribution to the discourse and is presented in this international conference in Amsterdam today. I am very happy to be part of this audience and share insights with the rest of the team. This volume is a valuable tool in understanding how the competition system works in Europe and I look forward to the next phase! 
The research is an ongoing project of Architectuur Lokaal and is programmed to be implemented over a period of four years with the aim to improve access to competitions, to analyze procedures, to establish a network of organizations and to collect case studies of good and bad practice. 


Images (c) Indira Van’t Klooster

3rd International Conference on ‘Changing Cities’_Paper: Mapping connections in online learning communities: architectural knowledge creation in the ‘connectivist’ paradigm

THEORY

The paper contributes to the understanding of social learning in architectural education through the examination of online collaborative practices and the connectivist paradigm in particular. Urban research conducted by NTUA educators and PhD students was used to create the body of content for a postgraduate course that ran for two consecutive years. The course format was hybrid; beside the traditional in-class meetings, an online platform was used to share content and exchange information between teachers and students. Students also were requested to establish their personal blogs. Their interactivity was monitored and evaluated in regard to their submitted projects and their overall performance. The way individual learners appropriated the information and the way they collaborated in a learning community with shared goals opens up to another form of knowledge creation and sharing between individuals.

Keywords: learning community; interactivity; analytics; data contextualization; connectivity; learning patterns.