Circular cities

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Article discusses the efforts of Prof. Williams in UCL in promoting the ideas and practices of the Circular City by establishing UCL’s Circular Cities Hub in 2016.
A book is to be expected in 2020 entitled “Circular Cities: A Revolution in Urban Sustainability” by Williams that will be published by Routledge.

Part of this has involved viewing cities holistically. This means not just looking at resources, but seeing urban areas as organisms that constantly adapt to changes, such as migration and increasing diversity, as well as considering different trajectories of development, from shrinking, post-industrial cities such as Detroit, to places like London, where corporate and foreign investment is squeezing out lower-value, circular activities.

The benefits of Teaching Commons

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Pedagogy: In order to counter institutional antipathy towards studio based learning an effective and inclusive counter argument, grounded in educational research from wider scholarly sources, could offer a common position for all schools in presenting the studio as a unique, authentic and invaluable learning environment.

Resources: An Architectural Learning Commons could share knowledge and initiatives to drive economies of time, money and effort through open and constructive collaboration through:

  • the sharing of resources
  • reciprocal arrangements for staff exchanges
  • shared use of expertise, contacts and physical spaces
  • the co-operative funding of visiting speakers from overseas

Policy: a collaborative and concerted position could strengthen a collective bargaining position for schools of architecture, in contrast to the currently divisive and target-driven competition between institutions

Ethics: a collective architectural education constitutes a Scholarship of Integration in support of valuable, relevant and good work/ schools will not necessarily lose their distinctive values and philosophies by sharing common knowledge, skills, resources
and expertise with one another/ further collaborative educational research would benefit the critical development of architectural pedagogies to address recalcitrant problems of traditional teaching methods

 

References

Holgate, P., Sara, R., 2014. Towards a learning commons for architecture. In Charrette 1(1) Summer 2014

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